How to choose the best photograph for your hand drawn portrait

Choosing the perfect photograph for your portrait can be a little nerve-racking but it doesn’t need to be. Don’t stress about choosing a perfect photo, just choose one that captures your child’s personality and we can make it work from there.

Expression is key

When children are young it’s really hard to get those great photos because they just won’t be still long enough. But that’s one of the biggest benefits of drawing a portrait. I can remove hair that’s blown out of place, sticky crumbs or stains, or even change a plain t-shirt to one with a collar. The most important thing is that the expression and detail of the face really capture your child.

Remember, the photo doesn’t need to be perfect, but I can’t work miracles either. It does need to be high quality so that the details are visible. I can change small things but it’s best if the changes stay to a minimum. I can move a few stray hairs for instance, but I can’t change a frown into a smile.

Sometimes it’s helpful to send several photos of your child for me to work from. However, you’ll still need to choose the one that the portrait will be based off of, and I’ll just use the others to supplement details.

Details, details, details

  • Digital photos should run around 1 to 2 gb in size to show the most detail.
  • Print photos should be 8×10 for the best results but 5×7 at a minimum. (A 4×6 really only works if it’s cropped to just the face.)
  • Make sure the facial expression is one you love because I can’t change that without losing the likeness.
  • The better you can see the color of the eyes the better drawing it will make.
  • I can draw from professional photos, but I’ll need to have permission from the photographer to use a copyrighted image.
  • Remember, if I can’t see it in the photo then I have to fill in the blanks with my imagination. The more I have to do that, the more likely it will stray from reality.

Combining photos

Group Portraits:

If it’s hard to get one child to sit still and smile pretty for a photo, it’s doubly hard to get two or more to do it. And all at the same time is practically impossible. For a portrait drawing, that’s not really a problem. Pick your favorite photo of each child and I’ll combine them together into one big drawing.

Photoshop Proofing

Once I have your photos, I’ll edit them in Photoshop to show you what the drawing will look like before I even touch the paper to start your drawing. I’ll edit any small changes that are needed, change the photo to gray-scale and include the touches of color that will be in the final drawing. If you aren’t sure if you want color or not, I can show what it will look like in both styles so you can make an educated decision.

If you have any questions, leave a comment below or contact me and I’ll answer them as best I can!

3 Responses to How to choose the best photograph for your hand drawn portrait
  1. Want one? | Studio Z Portraits
    September 20, 2011 | 9:43 am

    […] you need help choosing a reference photograph for your drawing. Here are some pointers on how to choose the best photo. 0 Comments – Leave a comment! « Previous […]

  2. […] their face. It’s the tiny details that make everyone look slightly different. I print out a reference photograph that is to scale for all of my portraits so I can precisely measure all of the details that make […]

  3. […] photo edited so I know what the final drawing will look like. I mentioned before that I can edit a photograph if there are small problems. I actually do all of these edits in Photoshop before I even begin the […]

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Wanting to leave an <em>phasis on your comment?

How to choose the best photograph for your hand drawn portrait

Choosing the perfect photograph for your portrait can be a little nerve-racking but it doesn’t need to be. Don’t stress about choosing a perfect photo, just choose one that captures your child’s personality and we can make it work from there.

Expression is key

When children are young it’s really hard to get those great photos because they just won’t be still long enough. But that’s one of the biggest benefits of drawing a portrait. I can remove hair that’s blown out of place, sticky crumbs or stains, or even change a plain t-shirt to one with a collar. The most important thing is that the expression and detail of the face really capture your child.

Remember, the photo doesn’t need to be perfect, but I can’t work miracles either. It does need to be high quality so that the details are visible. I can change small things but it’s best if the changes stay to a minimum. I can move a few stray hairs for instance, but I can’t change a frown into a smile.

Sometimes it’s helpful to send several photos of your child for me to work from. However, you’ll still need to choose the one that the portrait will be based off of, and I’ll just use the others to supplement details.

Details, details, details

  • Digital photos should run around 1 to 2 gb in size to show the most detail.
  • Print photos should be 8×10 for the best results but 5×7 at a minimum. (A 4×6 really only works if it’s cropped to just the face.)
  • Make sure the facial expression is one you love because I can’t change that without losing the likeness.
  • The better you can see the color of the eyes the better drawing it will make.
  • I can draw from professional photos, but I’ll need to have permission from the photographer to use a copyrighted image.
  • Remember, if I can’t see it in the photo then I have to fill in the blanks with my imagination. The more I have to do that, the more likely it will stray from reality.

Combining photos

Group Portraits:

If it’s hard to get one child to sit still and smile pretty for a photo, it’s doubly hard to get two or more to do it. And all at the same time is practically impossible. For a portrait drawing, that’s not really a problem. Pick your favorite photo of each child and I’ll combine them together into one big drawing.

Photoshop Proofing

Once I have your photos, I’ll edit them in Photoshop to show you what the drawing will look like before I even touch the paper to start your drawing. I’ll edit any small changes that are needed, change the photo to gray-scale and include the touches of color that will be in the final drawing. If you aren’t sure if you want color or not, I can show what it will look like in both styles so you can make an educated decision.

If you have any questions, leave a comment below or contact me and I’ll answer them as best I can!

3 Responses to How to choose the best photograph for your hand drawn portrait
  1. Want one? | Studio Z Portraits
    September 20, 2011 | 9:43 am

    […] you need help choosing a reference photograph for your drawing. Here are some pointers on how to choose the best photo. 0 Comments – Leave a comment! « Previous […]

  2. […] their face. It’s the tiny details that make everyone look slightly different. I print out a reference photograph that is to scale for all of my portraits so I can precisely measure all of the details that make […]

  3. […] photo edited so I know what the final drawing will look like. I mentioned before that I can edit a photograph if there are small problems. I actually do all of these edits in Photoshop before I even begin the […]

Leave a Reply

Wanting to leave an <em>phasis on your comment?